With an ambition to strengthen the pivotal role of knowledge and science in society, Malmö University has set out to host a series of top quality seminars, start autumn 2017. With a total of six seminars, the series Knowledge for Change will highlight topics related to societal challenges.  We want to inspire cross-disciplinary discussions and cultivate relations and alliances both in and outside of academia – locally and globally.

Knowledge for Change #5
Liberal Democracy and its Racial Others: The West in the Age of Trumpism  

Professor Ananya Roy , University of California, Los Angeles.

Lecture
Title:  Liberal Democracy and its Racial Others: The West in the Age of Trumpism.
October 10, 2018 at Malmö University.

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Article
Professor Ananya Roy´s article Liberal Democracy and Its Racial Others in the Age of Trumpism:  Why Decolonizing the University Matters is related to the keynote topic (preamble): 
The resurgence of right-wing nationalism is today a worldwide phenomenon. From the Hindutva of the Modi regime in India to the electoral success of far right political parties in various European countries, a new political moment of xenophobia and chauvinism is taking hold in many parts of the world. I characterize this historical conjuncture as the age of Trumpism not because the Trump administration is unique but rather because it is paradigmatic of such trends. On the one hand, I view Trumpism as a continuation of long-standing structures of racism, and in turn, I view these structures as integral to liberal democracy. On the other hand, I interpret Trumpism as a rupture with previous formations of state power. In particular, I am concerned with the institutionalization of white racial domination in statecraft. Following Paul Gilroy (2000: 139), I argue that such statecraft must be seen as fascist in its tendencies, practicing “raciology” and legitimating its militaristic and masculinist power through “a stimulating world of signs to which racial difference [is] absolutely fundamental.”

Read Ananya Roy´s article
Ananya Roy´s article (Print version)

Knowledge for Change #4
Reflections on Responsible Digital Societies 

Professor José van Dijck, University of Utrecht.

Lecture
Title:  Reflections on Responsible Digital Societies.
June 8, 2018 at Malmö University.

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Article
Professor José van Dijck´s article Reflections on creating responsible digital societies in Europe is related to the keynote topic (preamble):
Online digital platforms have deeply penetrated every sector in society, disrupting markets, labor relations and institutions, while transforming social and civic practices; and as we have experienced over the past two years, online dynamics are affecting the very core of democratic processes. The evolving digitization of society involve intense struggles between competing ideological systems and contesting societal actors – market, government and civil society – raising an important question: Who is or should be responsible and accountable for anchoring public values in digitized and datafied societies? I will particularly focus on the European challenge to govern platform societies which are increasingly dependent on global commercial infrastructures—ecosystems that are privatized and whose mechanisms are hidden from public view.

Read José van Dijck´s article 
José van Dijck´s article (Print version)

Knowledge for Change #3
Urban Imaginations and the social dynamics of the 21st century

Professor Göran Therborn, Professor Emeritus in Sociology at Cambridge University.

Lecture
Title:  Urban Imaginations and the social dynamics of the 21st century
January 18, 2018 at Malmö University.

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Article
Professor Göran Therborn´s article is related to and with the same title as the keynote topic (preamble):
Social knowledge differs from the knowledge which the modern hard sciences deal with and produce.
A major problem of social science, and of social cognition generally, including the one used by politicians and managers, is the abundance of social knowledge. Even if we, with quite a bit of nonchalance, neglect the knowledge of children under fifteen, there are about 5.5 billion human social knowers in today’s world. One reason why social scientists do not get a Nobel Prize is probably that we have too many competitors.

Read Göran Ternborn´s article 
Göran Therborn´s article (Print version)

Knowledge for Change #2
The Promise of Empirical Evidence and Benchmarks: The Lorelei’s Whispers

Professor Thomas S. Popkewitz, University of Wisconsin-Madison and Guest professor at the Faculty of Education and Society, Malmö University.

Lecture
Title: The Promise of Empirical Evidence and Benchmarks: the Lorelei’s Whispers.
October 17, 2017 at Malmö University.

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Article
Professor Thomas S. Popkewitz´ article is related to and with the same title as the keynote topic (preamble) :
There is a “commonsense” in the contemporary use of benchmarks and finding empirical evidence as a way of reasoning about change and quality. That common sense is that the correct mixture of research and policy will provide the pathways for effective change. This notion of change has produced prominent sets of connections between educational sectors, comparative research about the metrics of educational performance and policy in many countries, such as Sweden. The assessments are tied to a variety of models designed to change social welfare agencies, universities and national educational systems.

Read Thomas S. Popkowitz´ article 
Thomas Popkewitz´ article (Print version)

Knowledge for Change #1
Seeking a Larger Purpose: Espousing a New Flagship Model

Professor John A. Douglass, University of California, Berkeley.

Lecture
Title:  Seeking a Larger Purpose: Espousing a New Flagship Model.
September 14, 2017 at Malmö University.

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Article
Professor John A. Douglass´ article A Vibrant Urban University with a Growing Global Presence – Thoughts on What Malmö University Could Be is related to the keynote topic (preamble):
It is a malady of the modern age for universities. The forces of globalization and a campaign by various international university ranking enterprises place too much emphasis on a narrow model of what the best universities should be. One result: the notion of a “World Class University” (WCU) and the focus on its close relative, global rankings of universities, dominates the higher education policymaking of ministries and major universities throughout the globe.

Read John A. Douglass´ article
John A. Douglass´ article (Print version)